Huntsville, Alabama

Day 264

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     The Deep South doesn’t get any deeper than Alabama. This is where cotton was king, where the Confederacy was born, and where Jefferson Davis’ birthday is still a holiday. We came here to get warm, but the temperature is still only in the 50’s.

     Alabama was admitted as the 22nd state on December 14, 1819.  

     Wernher von Braun was born in Wirsitz, Germany March 23, 1912. He received a doctorate degree in physics from the University of Berlin in 1934. He was interested in rocketry and his work became widely known, which led to the establishment of the Rocket Center at Peenemuende, Germany in 1937. During WW2 he led the team that developed the V-2 liquid fueled rocket used in the bombing of England. 

     When the Allied forces advanced into Germany, von Braun and some of his colleagues surrendered to the U.S. Army. The German rocketeers began working with the Army to enhance the V-2 and develop other rockets. 

     In 1941 the Army chose Huntsville, Alabama as the location of a wartime chemical munitions plant and arsenal, now called Redstone Arsenal. It was here that von Braun was eventually brought. In 1950, von Braun became the technical director of rocket development. On April 14, 1955 he became a United States Citizen. 

     On July 29, 1958, President Eisenhower established the National Aeronautics and Space Administration day-264-huntsville-al-9579_fotor

      Responding to President Kennedy’s challenge to reach the moon, he led the team that developed the Saturn Rocket that took Apollo 11 to the moon and back. This site became the Marshall Space Flight Center.

    Today we toured the museum, tomorrow we will go to the Marshall Space Flight Center.      

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They had a live feed from the International Space Station.

Barbara walks the Arm for her space walk.

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On display was one of the moon rocks brought back by

Apollo 11. I wonder if my brother, Norman, worked on that rock?

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Technical Stuff:

Cumming, GA to Huntsville, AL 248.4 miles

5 hours 7 minutes

10.0 MPG

Diesel: $2.34

 

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3 thoughts on “Huntsville, Alabama

  1. If you are going to head across I-10, when you eventually get near Alamogordo, NM, there is a great museum near the White Sands Missile Range similar to Huntsville called the New Mexico Museum of Space and the Space Hall of Fame that has some amazing exhibits of space exploration, NASA, missiles and the atomic bomb which was first tested not far from there at the Trinity Site. Of course, while you are there visit White Sands National Monument. Don’t forget to take card board boxes which you will understand when you get there. Don P.

    http://www.nmspacemuseum.org/

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