Kellogg, Iowa

Day 757

    The history of the town of Kellogg dates back to 1865 when the Central Rock Island and Pacific Railroad arrived. The Kellogg town site was already familiar to stagecoach travelers as Manning’s Station, so named for the depot and hotel operated by Dan Manning. When the railroad made public their intention of proceeding west, designating this as a station, Dr. A.W. Adair, from Ohio, laid out the town and on September 12, 1865, had it duly recorded in the court house in Newton as Jasper City. Later, the post office was established in the name of Kimball, as a compliment to A. Kimball, Esq., the superintendent of the Iowa Division of the railroad. Mr. Kimball protested against this, insisting that the name be Kellogg, after Judge Abel Avery Kellogg. Thus the town had four names since it’s beginning, eight years earlier. 

     The town of Kellogg was incorporated in 1873 and made a municipality in 1874. 

     Today was the Kellogg Fire Department’s annual slip & slide event.  The whole town showed up. 

     Most of the above history was derived by our tour of the Kellogg Museum. Our guide was 95 year old Mary Parsons. She moved to Kellogg about 40 years ago. I asked her why move to this very small town, she responded “I didn’t know any better”.

     She showed us this unusual “iceless refrigerator”.

     The cabinet, with shelves and a hole in the bottom, was placed over a well, with food placed on the shelves. The shelves were then lowered down the well to just above the waterline, the coolest area around.

     A photograph of Mary, at age five, along side of the iceless refrigerator was displayed.

     Mary’s maiden name was Tough. She told us that her name is Mary Parsons, but she was born Tough.  And, as a spry 95 years old, she proved it. 

Technical Stuff:

Ellendale, Minnesota, to Kellogg, Iowa: 194.4 miles

3 hours 36 minutes

10.4 MPG

Diesel: $3.09

6 thoughts on “Kellogg, Iowa

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