Auburn, Alabama

Day 801

     Auburn, Alabama, was opened to settlement on March 24, 1832 on land taken from the Creek Indians. The first settlers arrived in the winter of 1836. These settlers, led by Judge John J. Harper, born December 13, 1789, in Wilkes County, Georgia, intended to build a town that would be the religious and educational center for the area.

     According to local lore, a young woman chose the name for the town from the first line in Oliver Goldsmith’s poem, “The Deserted Village,” published in 1770, which reads “Sweet Auburn, the loveliest village of the plain.” Auburn was incorporated on February 2, 1839. On February 1, 1856, the state legislature chartered a Methodist college, the East Alabama Male College in Auburn. This college, now Auburn University, opened its doors in 1859.

     Not far from here is Moton Airfield: 

      Those who remember from high school the Red Tail Fighters of WWII know where I am. 

     Robert Russa Moton was born August 26, 1867, just west of Richmond, Virginia. He was the second president of Tuskegee Institute, succeeding it’s founder, Booker T. Washington, in 1915, a position he held for 20 years until retirement in 1935. Tuskegee Institute’s primary flight training field was dedicated in April 1943 in memory of Dr. Moton.

     In late 1939, after World War II had begun in Europe, Tuskegee Institute inaugurated a civilian flight-training program that provided the foundation for the subsequent military aviation training of the famed Tuskegee Airmen. The Tuskegee Airmen were the first negro pilots in U.S. military service, and the only ones in World War II. They became known as the Tuskegee Airmen because all of them received their primary, basic, and advanced pilot training here at Tuskegee Institute. The term has come to be applied not only to the almost 1,000 pilots, but also to approximately 13,600 other personnel who supported them as maintenance and supply personnel.

Technical Stuff: Guntersville, Alabama to Auburn, Alabama: 215.6 miles

4 hours 47 minutes

9.6 MPG

Diesel: $3.10

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