Reunion Lake RV Park, Ponchatoula, Louisiana

Day 1191

     We have reached our winter destination. It took us 6 days to cover  the 1,372.9 miles. This is the 6th time we have stayed at Reunion Lake. We will winter here until tax day and then move on to our next destination. Barbara’s brother, nieces and nephews live in the area, plus other RV’ers we have camped with in the past are here at the park. Since we will be here for Mardi Gras, we will go to New Orleans for the parades. 

Technical Stuff:

Chattahoochee, Florida to Ponchatoula, La: 355.7 miles

6 hours 32 minutes

10.0 MPG

Diesel: $2.83

Chattahoochee, Florida

Day 1190

     For our last night on our trek to Louisiana, we are camped out in Chattahoochee, Florida. There is nothing here. We had to drive 15 miles to Walmart to get DEF for the truck. Chattahoochee is a name derived from the Creek language meaning “marked rocks”. I did not see any rocks, much less marked ones. If we were staying here longer, I would seek them out. 

     Tomorrow we will drive 358 miles through the rest of the Florida Panhandle, through Alabama and Mississippi to Louisiana, it should take us about 7 hours, with a rest stop or two. 

Technical Stuff: 

Hardeeville, South Carolina to Chattahoochee, Florida: 348.8 miles

6 hours 31 minutes

10.2 MPG

Diesel: $2.90

Fayetteville, North Carolina

Day 1187

     Another short layover on our beeline to warm weather. Did some maintenance and repairs. When you take your house and shake it like a cocktail, something is always going wrong. Barbara calls them “challenges”. I call them “I can’t believe this is happening.” 

     But we manage to meet them all. All is good now, and we are back on the road at sunrise. 

Technical Stuff:

Ashland, Virginia to Fayetteville, North Carolina: 236 miles

4 hours 32 minutes (It’s downhill)

11.0 MPG

Diesel: $2.77

Finally, Bugging Out Of Maryland

Day 1186

     We have broken away from Maryland and are making a beeline to warm weather. Today we are in Ashland, Virginia. We will be here only one night. Tomorrow, North Carolina, then South Carolina, and Florida. 

     When we hit Florida, we will turn right and travel the panhandle to Louisiana, where we will remain the rest of the winter. 

      Because we are staying only one or two nights at each campground, and we have been to these places before, we will not be doing any sightseeing. 

      In April, we will decide our next move. I want to cross Death Valley. Barbara wants to go back to Branson, Missouri. We still haven’t traveled the West Coast, up the Pacific Highway from California to Oregon. 

     In the past, when we have taken a vote which ended in a tie, I lost. 

Technical Stuff:  

Bar Harbor, Maryland to Ashland, Virginia: 182.3 miles

5 hours 3 minutes

10.6 MPG

Diesel: $2.77

 

Harbor Place, Baltimore Maryland

Day 1121

    Harbor place, Baltimore City, Maryland, opened on July 2, 1980 as a centerpiece of the revival of downtown Baltimore
     
     The last time I was at harbor place, was 4 years ago when I tried a case in the Baltimore City Circuit Court (I won, of course). The first thing I notice was how clean the harbor was. Usually full of trash and debris, it was crystal clear. The reason, I discovered was the Inner Harbor Water Wheel. 

     It uses old and new technology. Powered by the water and the sun, it can produce up to 30 kilowatt-hours of electricity. The Water Wheel is capable of removing 50,000 pounds of trash every day. 

     The Light at Seven Foot Knoll marked the outlet entrance to Baltimore’s harbor and was manned from 1856 to 1948, when the Coast Guard automated it. In 1988 the lighthouse was retired and moved to it’s present position at Pier 5 in the Inner Harbor.

     Going through the 3 pavillions that make up Harbor Place, I found that 80% of the stores were vacant. Far cry from the vibrant hustle and bustle of 4 years ago. This is probably explained by the fact that as of May 30, 2019, Harborplace was placed into court-ordered receivership.

Rumsey Island, Joppa, Maryland

Day 1120

     Joppa was founded as a British settlement on the Gunpowder River in 1707. The settlement was named for the Biblical town of Jaffa, in the ancient Holy Land of modern day Israel.  

     Joppa was a major seaport in colonial times and served as the county seat of the original Baltimore County. The town proper was located on what is now called Rumsey Island, where the Big Gunpowder Falls and Little Gunpowder Falls meet to form the Gunpowder River. The wide harbor could accommodate the largest ocean-going ships of the day and, long before Baltimore Harbor was established, Joppa was one of the busiest ports in the western hemisphere. It became the focal point of virtually all aspects of public and political life in colonial central Maryland.

     Benjamin Rumsey was born October 6, 1734 at Bohemia Manor in Cecil County, Province of Maryland (the Revolutionary War won’t take place for another 44 years). He settled in Joppa about 1768 and lived here the rest of his life. When a new state superior court (the Maryland Court of Appeals) was created in 1778, Benjamin Rumsey was appointed as its first chief justice. Maryland sent him as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1776 and 1777, he was not one of the 4 signers of the Declaration for Independence from Maryland.

     Tidbit of Information: Maryland send a total of 19 delegates to the 1st & 2nd Continental Congresses.

     Over the years, the Gunpowder River and the harbor silted up and in 1768 the county seat was moved to Baltimore, which became Maryland’s major shipping port. By 1814, Joppa was mostly abandoned.

     Church of the Resurrection is an Episcopal Church in Joppa and is a community of the Episcopal Church and the American Anglicans. Located on Rumsey Island in the city of Joppatowne. It was established in 1724. The present Episcopal Church of the Resurrection is located on the property of the original 1724 brick church.

     When ‘redevelopment’ threatened to destroy the original townsite, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy intervened and the grounds of St. John’s parish church, along with adjacent lots, were acquired by the Episcopal Church. The church was reconsecrated and renamed Church of the Resurrection, preserving the archeological ruins.

     To commemorate their original accomplishments, the church puts on an annual celebration.

     We attended a concert by the colonial band,

     Received sage information from one of the old timers,

     Learned the craft of photography of the time.

     They say this was the Maryland flag of 1724, but I found no corroboration of this, and I seriously doubt this flag was present in 1724. Maryland was the 7th state admitted to the Union on April 28, 1788, but it wasn’t until October 11, 1880 that a flag was first flown representing Maryland, and it wasn’t this flag.